Universit├Ąt Z├╝rich

IPMZ - Institute of Mass Communication and Media Research

Media Change & Innovation Division

Andreasstrasse 15
CH-8050 Zurich
Phone +41 (0)44 635 20 92
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News

  • William Drake, International Fellow and Lecturer in the Media Change and Innovation Division has edited a new volume entitled, The Working Group on Internet Governance:10th Anniversary Reflections http://amzn.to/22hWZxC.  

     

    Convened by the UN Secretary General in 2004, the Working Group on Internet Governance (WGIG) was an important turning point in the UN’s three year World Summit on the Information Society negotiations.  

     

    The WGIG advance global understanding of the nature of Internet governance and the issues and institutions involved, and it produced a report with recommendations that included the creation of the UN’s Internet Governance Forum. This book brings together former WGIG members and other leading voices in the WSIS to reflect on the WGIG’s procedural and substantive contributions to the evolving global Internet governance ecosystem.

     

    The volume is a follow-up to a previous book — William J. Drake, ed., Reforming Internet Governance: Perspectives from the UN Working Group on Internet Governance (2005). 

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    As the single most important general purpose technology of recent times, the Internet is transforming the
    organization, competitive structure and business models of the private, the public and non-profit sectors. In
    twenty six original chapters, leading authors discuss theoretical frameworks for the study of the economics of the
    Internet and its unique economics as a global information and communications infrastructure. They also examine
    the effects of the Internet on economic transactions (including social production, advertising, innovation, and
    intellectual property rights), the economics and management of Internet-based industries (including search, news,
    entertainment, culture, and virtual worlds), and the effects of the Internet on the economy at large.

    The "Handbook on the Economics of the Internet" edited by Prof. Johannes M. Bauer of Michigan State University and Prof. Michael Latzer, will be published in May 2016.

     

    As the single most important general purpose technology of recent times, the Internet is transforming the organization, competitive structure and business models of the private, the public and non-profit sectors. In this book project, leading authors discuss theoretical frameworks for the study of the economics of the Internet and its unique economics as a global information and communications infrastructure.

     

     

     

    Click here for a larger image of the brochure and contributing authors (pdf)

     

    They also examine the effects of the Internet on economic transactions (including social production, advertising, innovation, and intellectual property rights), the economics and management of Internet-based industries (including search, news, entertainment, culture, and virtual worlds), and the effects of the Internet on the economy at large.

     

    Critical Acclaim


    ‘Internet development dynamics are tackled in this Handbook by leading scholars representing mainstream, institutional, evolutionary economics and political economy perspectives. They show how complex markets for digital technologies and services are evolving. Crucially, they demonstrate why conventional analytical tool kits need to be extended by bridging disciplinary boundaries. This volume offers significant advances in the analysis of technological and institutional change and demonstrates how important it is to acknowledge conflict resolution and tradeoffs as essential aspects of the internet’s history and its future.’

    Robin Mansell, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK


    'The Internet has transformed many fundamental economic facts of life and business, but it is challenging to catalogue them all. This topic deserves a comprehensive handbook, and the editors have delivered. The chapters are engaging and lucid, and cover a wide range of topics. The editors were not shy about spanning boundaries between technical detail, economic analysis, and policy relevance. This is a great resource for any modern scholar of the Internet.'

    Shane Greenstein, Harvard Business School, US